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D’OUWE WERF (1802) HOFMEYR HALL (1899)
DEVONSHIRE HOUSE (1851) WIJNHUIS
VILLAGE MUSEUM SCHREUDERHUIS
BLETTERMANHUIS (1789) GROSVENOR HOUSE (c.1803)
BERGH-HUIS MOEDERKERK (1863)
MAIDEN’S HOPE 
 

D’OUWE WERF (1802)

30 Church Street

This is possibly the oldest extant tavern in South Africa, counting amongst its distinguished guests the German traveller, naturalist and author, Dr. M.H.C. Lichstenstein (1803), and the British Colonial Governor and statesman Sir George Grey (1860). Until ca. 1890 this L-plan house with its two-room deep front section had a tall thatched roof and elegant gables, as well as a flat-roofed loft over the archway leading to the backyard. Here, beneath the modem restaurant, are to be seen the remains of the first permanent Christian church in southern Africa, erected in 1687 and destroyed by the fire of 1710, after which much of its building material was used for the second church. At that time the whole street block consisted solely of the church, enclosed by a fenced graveyard.

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HOFMEYR HALL (1899)

39 Church Street

This purpose-built Y.M.C.A. hall in Greek Revival style was named after Theology Professor N.J. Hofmeyr, enthusiastic teacher and youth counsellor. It now serves as a missionary centre and contains an exhibition of missionary work.
 

DEVONSHIRE HOUSE (1851)

15 Ryneveld Street

A restrained early-Victorian double-storey with a pitched roof of Welsh slate. Note the elegant round-headed doors and fine woodwork. It was erected by a descendent of Adriaan van Brakel, builder of the first drostdy (1687).
 

VILLAGE MUSEUM

18 Ryneveld Street

The museum encompasses nearly 5000 square metres of the oldest part of the town. Original houses from different periods of Stellenbosch’s history have been lovingly restored and furnished to illustrate the development of the town.
Open: Mondays to Saturdays: 09:30 - 17:00; Sundays: 14:00 - 17:00. Entrance fee

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SCHREUDERHUIS

Drosdy Street

This is the oldest restored town house in South Africa, built by Sebastian Schröder, messenger of the court, and was depicted shortly after its completion on the oldest sketch of Stellenbosch (wide panorama, directly behind the church). Note the lead-glazed windows.
 

BLETTERMANHUIS (1789)

 Drosdy Street

Built as a retirement house by Magistrate H.L. Bletterman shortly before retiring in 1795. It was later converted into public service offices -and was restored-in 1983 and furnished in the "Cape baroque" style from the second half of the eighteenth century.
 

GROSVENOR HOUSE (c.1803)

Drosdy Street

This was the first and presently, only Cape Dutch double-storey in Stellenbosch, erected by C.L. Neethling. The flat roof, covered by plaster (corrugated iron roofs only appear after 1850) is characteristic of this house, as are the top-and-bottom door, small pane single sliding sash-windows and exterior shutters. One can also observe some neo-classical elements in the grooved pilasters and temple-shaped doorframe, with its Biblical palm tree (Psalm 92: 13) in the pediment. The restored interior represents the first decades of the nineteenth century, when J.W. Herold used to live here.
 

BERGH-HUIS

Drosdy Street

This was initially an H-plan house, occupied by the deputy bailiff Olof Marthinus Bergh between 1837 and 1866. The house was subsequently enlarged and the opening between the pair of side gables became the entrance-hall. The ornate interior represents the home of a well-to-do Stellenboscher of the Victorian era between 1840 and 1880.

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MOEDERKERK (DUTCH REFORMED CHURCH)(1863)

Drosdy Street

The lofty neo-gothic church with its tall spire was the common creation of the idealistic Minister, the Rev. Jan Neethling (statue in the church garden), the German architect Carl Otto Hager, and the English builder James Jardine. This "Latin cruciform" structure was preceded by two thatched roof churches on this same site. The first, built "above the wind" in 1722 after the pioneer church (vide panorama) was burnt down in 1710, was erected with a Greek cross ground plan consisting of two wings of equal length and a front gable. The trapezoidal perimeter wall of 1735 is still largely intact. In 1814 the church was substantially enlarged by the four wings and rounding them off with neo-classical pilaster gables, virtually identical with the eastern gable of the later Rhenish Church. The custom of burying the dead inside the church was terminated in 1807 when the first tiled floor was laid. Thereafter family burial vaults were constructed against the graveyard wall. Shortly before the inauguration of the "Moederkerk" ("Mother Church") in 1863 all dilapidated family crypts were levelled, and the remains were transferred to a new graveyard. The final construction work to the Church was the completion of the steeple in 1866.

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MAIDEN’S HOPE

47 Church Street

This symmetrical late Victorian double-storey used to be a popular boarding-house for male students of the Victoria College.
 

WIJNHUIS

corner Andringa and Churchstreet

This was originally part of a number of early 19th century thatched dwellings which was burnt down in the great fire of 1875. As a result it was much altered and Victorianised. Its interior loft today serves as a restaurant and wine tasting centre. One can see part of one of the original remaining walls at the entrance.
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